When things come apart: Diastasis Recti

So I’m trying to be really positive and not dwell on the past, but I recently had hernia surgery for a hernia that didn’t exist.  And I still have the original problem that I started with.  Yes, that’s right, a faux hernia.

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About 10 weeks postop

 

I don’t know where I went wrong, but I wish that I had gotten more opinions and visited women’s specialists instead of a general surgeon.  I was diagnosed with a hernia in May because I had a small place above my belly button that bulged slightly when I worked out.  An ultrasound didn’t show any tears in the fascia, which is what qualifies a hernia, but the general surgeon said that it was a hernia and that he could fix it.  To be fair, it was a weak spot in my fascia, and it was bound to only get worse with my activity level.  I was scared and I asked for the surgery.  The general surgeon was really good, but he essentially fixed a hernia that didn’t exist, and now I have a weak spot above my belly button AND scar tissue.

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After 6 weeks of recovery, I was able to resume all of my normal activities at the end of June, which means I started my strength routine again.  Right away, I noticed a bump pop out below the incision area.  I went to the surgeon the next week for a follow-up, and he said that it was not anything.  After a month more of exercise, I have continued to feel something “pop” out along the midline of my belly near the incision.  It is not visible, but clearly I can feel something happening beneath the skin, and I am able to “push” it back into place.

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I would do anything for this little lollipop!

Post op deja vu has definitely been a test of my character.  I went back to my surgeon last Friday and met with the physician’s assistant.  She gave me a lot more insight and reassurance about what was happening, but it still does not make me happy.  Essentially, I have diastatis recti, or ab separation, to the tune of 2.5 cm (normal separation is about .5 cm), and the fascia running down the center of my abdomen is holding everything in.  The PA did an ultrasound to confirm that I do not have a tear in my fascia (I have never had a tear in my fascia), but fascia is weaker than muscle, and my fascia is having to hold in my intestines.  There is nothing that I did during my postop recovery to make this happen.  It is just general anatomy.  I am pretty thin right now (breastfeeding and training for my first 100 mile race), so I do not have much of a fat layer to act as a buffer.  What I am feeling “pop” along the middle of my abdomen are my intestines as they push through my abs and against the fascia.  I’m a living science project!

The PA told me that a tummy tuck is the only solution to ab separation, but I cannot believe that something muscle related can only be fixed through surgery.  (Also remember that these are the surgeons who operated on a hernia that didn’t exist on me.)  So, this week I have called around to a few physical therapists and made an appointment to see one on Thursday morning.

I can’t help but feel guilt, regret, confusion, and fear about my condition.  I was cleared by my OB for all activities in October after I had Cadence.  All through pregnancy and postpartum, I took fitness classes specifically geared towards the right exercises for new mom bodies.  I read about Steph Rothstein’s postpartum journey of ab separation, but I really didn’t think that I needed to worry much about it since all of my doctors had told me that I was cleared to continue any type of exercise that I wanted.  I was vocal about training for Boston and running ultra marathons.  I also thought that I had covered everything with my surgeon, who told me that I could resume all physical activities after 6 weeks postop.  Good as new.

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We are dedicated to our training schedule. 🙂

I am not sure why I am only feeling these symptoms later in my postpartum journey, other than that my intensity level has increased while I have also gotten thinner.  I am hopeful that I will be able to correct some of the separation.  The physical therapist assured me on the phone that diastatis recti is genetically predisposed, and there are some exercises that I can do to help strengthen my core again.  I’ll find out more on Thursday at my appointment.

Thank you if you have followed my story this far.  One last thing that I want to end with.  Recently I was reading my Bible and I came across the passage below.  It just reminded me about how much God wants for us to go to him in prayer for everything.  He is the ultimate Creator and Healer.  So my prayer is that my body will heal and I’ll be protected from any further discomfort or damage in my abdomen.  I do not want to worry about it every time I pick up my daughter or go for a run. I pray for peace of mind and healing.

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Do you have experience with diastasis recti?

Did you do any type of postpartum physical therapy?

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Update: You can read about my physical therapy appointments here.

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